Higuchi et al., 2005). The perfume wearer may then adjust their behaviour to appear more attractive (Vrij, Edward, & Bull, 2001 as cited in Higuchi, Shoji, Taguchi, & Hatayama,2005). Perfume increases positivity in an individual, reducing nervous behaviour and negative behavioural mannerisms, thus creating an impression of confidence.Olfactics influence other aspects of nonverbal communication such as visual facial processing and decision making in relation to certain stimuli. The sense of smell can be linked strongly with emotions and because of this, odours can be used to trigger certain responses in social contexts (Cavazzana, Wesarg, Parish-Morris, Lundström, & Parma, 2016; see also Kossen, Kiernan, & Lawrence, 2013). A study by Cavazzana et al. (2016) assessed olfactory-visual matching abilities in 140 children whereby pictures of happy or disgusted faces were to be selected alongside three odorous choices (Cavazzana et al., 2016). The results indicated that when children were presented with a neutral or pleasant odour, they were more likely to choose the happy face and with the exposure of the unpleasant smell, the disgusted face (Cavazzana et al., 2016). These findings support the notion that, “pleasant and unpleasant odors sic elicit affective reactions, and that these reactions influence people’s decisions and modulate their approach or avoidance responses to different stimuli” (Cavazzana et al., 2016, p. 2). Other situations such as the one presented by (Chebat, Morrin, & Chebat, 2009, as cited in Cavazzana et al., 2016) describes shoppers spending more money when the air is pleasantly scented as opposed to unscented. Or in another observed by (Inbar, Pizarro, & Bloom, 2012, as cited in Cavazzana et al., 2016) where a disgusting smell can be lead to negative decisions and societal situations such as racial dislike (Inbar et al., 2012, as cited in Cavazzana et al., 2016). This can have many social or workplace implications considering the link between emotional memory recall. Emotional transference can apply to certain scents or situations affecting the judgement of another individual or staff member.